scienceyoucanlove:




This incredible photo taken off the coast of Uruguay shows the contrast of bioluminescence created by tiny creatures called ‘sea sparkles’ and the glow of the Milky Way in one of the darkest skies in the world.
Read more: http://bit.ly/1uYZDHS via Earth Science Picture of the Day






from ScienceAlert


this is amazing on so many levels.

scienceyoucanlove:

This incredible photo taken off the coast of Uruguay shows the contrast of bioluminescence created by tiny creatures called ‘sea sparkles’ and the glow of the Milky Way in one of the darkest skies in the world.

this is amazing on so many levels.

(via themisscook)

spaceplasma:

Zooming in on the Lagoon Nebula

Zooming on an image of the Lagoon Nebula taken with the Advanced Camera for Surveys (ACS) on the NASA/ESA Hubble Space Telescope. This spectacular object is named after the wide lagoon-shaped dust lane that crosses the glowing gas of the nebula. The Lagoon Nebula is around four to five thousand light-years away in the constellation Sagittarius.

Credit: NASA, ESA, ESO/Digitised Sky Survey 2, S. Brunier and S. Guisard

spaceplasma:

Zooming in on the Lagoon Nebula

Zooming on an image of the Lagoon Nebula taken with the Advanced Camera for Surveys (ACS) on the NASA/ESA Hubble Space Telescope. This spectacular object is named after the wide lagoon-shaped dust lane that crosses the glowing gas of the nebula. The Lagoon Nebula is around four to five thousand light-years away in the constellation Sagittarius.

Credit: NASA, ESA, ESO/Digitised Sky Survey 2, S. Brunier and S. Guisard

(via trnsatlanticfoe)

phiife:

this eases the entire fuck out of my mind.

i will never not reblog this. 

(via themisscook)

This combination of three wavelengths of light from NASA’s Solar Dynamics Observatory shows one of the multiple jets that led to a series of slow coronal puffs on Jan. 17, 2013. The light has been colorized in red, green and blue. 
amazing. 

This combination of three wavelengths of light from NASA’s Solar Dynamics Observatory shows one of the multiple jets that led to a series of slow coronal puffs on Jan. 17, 2013. The light has been colorized in red, green and blue. 

amazing. 

Since her death in 1979, the woman who discovered what the universe is made of has not so much as received a memorial plaque. Her newspaper obituaries do not mention her greatest discovery. […] Every high school student knows that Isaac Newton discovered gravity, that Charles Darwin discovered evolution, and that Albert Einstein discovered the relativity of time. But when it comes to the composition of our universe, the textbooks simply say that the most abundant atom in the universe is hydrogen. And no one ever wonders how we know.

Jeremy Knowles, discussing the complete lack of recognition Cecilia Payne gets, even today, for her revolutionary discovery. (via alliterate)

OH WAIT LEMME TELL YOU ABOUT CECILIA PAYNE.

Cecilia Payne’s mother refused to spend money on her college education, so she won a scholarship to Cambridge.

Cecilia Payne completed her studies, but Cambridge wouldn’t give her a degree because she was a woman, so she said fuck that and moved to the United States to work at Harvard.

Cecilia Payne was the first person ever to earn a Ph.D. in astronomy from Radcliffe College, with what Otto Strauve called “the most brilliant Ph.D. thesis ever written in astronomy.”

Not only did Cecilia Payne discover what the universe is made of, she also discovered what the sun is made of (Henry Norris Russell, a fellow astronomer, is usually given credit for discovering that the sun’s composition is different from the Earth’s, but he came to his conclusions four years later than Payne—after telling her not to publish).

Cecilia Payne is the reason we know basically anything about variable stars (stars whose brightness as seen from earth fluctuates). Literally every other study on variable stars is based on her work.

Cecilia Payne was the first woman to be promoted to full professor from within Harvard, and is often credited with breaking the glass ceiling for women in the Harvard science department and in astronomy, as well as inspiring entire generations of women to take up science.

Cecilia Payne is awesome and everyone should know her.

(via bansheewhale)

(via tricyclesinskirts)

themisscook:

wickedclothes:

Planetary Plates

Make sure your next meal is out of this world. This plate set features eight plates, each resembling a planet in our solar system. Ten inches in diameter and dishwasher safe. Sold on ThinkGeek.

Gimme

waaaaant so hard. 

tricyclesinskirts:

nevver: NASA satellite images printed on silk, Slow Factory

do want!